75 today and can still pull!

concernedresidentofbakerstreet:

blackcomicbookguy:

If you don’t have Iron Man cutting your blog in half then you’re automatically a member of hydra

#well shit i dont want to be a member of hydra 

concernedresidentofbakerstreet:

blackcomicbookguy:

If you don’t have Iron Man cutting your blog in half then you’re automatically a member of hydra

 

(Source: blackinjustice, via captainamerica-in-middle-earth)

worldpaintings:

Whoever already watched The Grand Budapest Hotel is probably wondering, whether the two central paintings in the film are real artworks. Whoever hasn’t watched the film yet, go watch it first and then come back to this post! The film is great!!

The “priceless” painting Boy with Apple in Wes Anderson’s film is actually a 21st-century, made-for-film creation. It was painted by artist Michael Taylor – so it’s a fiction within a fiction that plays delicately with the art history of old Europe, pretending it is a real Renaissance masterpiece.
The artist Johannes Van Hoytl the Younger, to whom this renowned and unimaginably expensive masterpiece is attributed in the film, has much in common with other masters of the Renaissance in northern Europe. In one of the interviews Wes Anderson said, that the reference was intentionally made to kind of Flemish painters. They were trying to suggest that it wasn’t an Italian Renaissance painting, but a more northern one.

When a film’s character realises the painting is missing, he notices a watercolour of lesbian lovers hanging on the wall instead of it, that instantly brings the Austrian genius Egon Schiele in mind. However, Two Lesbians Masturbating was painted by Rich Pellegrinocommissioned to create this Schiele-type erotic painting by Wes Anderson. 

Genius

Can you wipe out that much red?

(Source: iwouldvebeendrake01, via nudityandnerdery)

gunslingerannie:

europeansdomusicalsbetter:



stockade:



You’re welcome










This is the most useful thing I’ve ever reblogged.

gunslingerannie:

europeansdomusicalsbetter:

stockade:

You’re welcome

This is the most useful thing I’ve ever reblogged.

(Source: gyarados, via felthier)

rakugaki-otoko:

stunningpicture:

Lobster in a bucket looks like a gigantic monster on a metallic planet, and the waterdrops look like stars.

I… actually thought that’s what this was at first before reading that.

The world’s your lobster

rakugaki-otoko:

stunningpicture:

Lobster in a bucket looks like a gigantic monster on a metallic planet, and the waterdrops look like stars.

I… actually thought that’s what this was at first before reading that.

The world’s your lobster

(via catch-11)

"

My own feeling is that science fiction, of all the different forms of literature, is the one that most easily accepts the notion of change. Things are changing very quickly, and any kid who thinks about it knows that the world in which he or she will be a grown-up — which he or she will be helping to run — will be considerably different from this one. Maybe better, maybe worse, but different. Science fiction explores the future world.

I think more and more young people are beginning to feel that science fiction is the kind of literature that a person interested in reality should be reading.

"

- Isaac Asimov

A while back, I asked why it is that some science fiction is so good at predicting the future. Far and away, the most common answer was because people who read science fiction are then inspired to make that future a reality.

Asimov knew that.

Check out more from his 1983 interview with Dr. Julius Strangepork in Muppets magazine (yes, seriously) at Brain Pickings.

(via wilwheaton)

(Source: jtotheizzoe, via wilwheaton)

ap0calypses:

omfg

(Source: dopeybeauty, via lezbeein)

canisfamiliaris:

Venting.

canisfamiliaris:

Venting.

(Source: m0rtality)

canisfamiliaris:

Evidence of alien life

canisfamiliaris:

Evidence of alien life

(via pimpfdm)